Let Me Ask You a Question

Questions have a way of engaging the heart. Doctrinal statements, creeds, arguments and various proclamations don’t produce the kind and quality of engagement that a well placed question can. Jesus certainly knew this and often harnessed the power of the question – there are over 300 recorded in the bible.

This winter we’re exploring a few questions Jesus asked. Our intent is not so much come to Jesus with our own questions but rather to have him interrogate our hearts through his questions. This may sound harsh, but his questions do have a way of cutting through the clutter of our own lives and hearts, of helping us notice what is already there, but we may not be aware of it. His queries help us to be reflective in a way that our society does not typically encourage.

“Our deepest longing is not for answers but for Him. Ultimately we’re happier and more satisfied with mysteries than with any amount of explanation.”

Jesus’ questions also encourage relationship. He doesn’t just tell us what to believe – he invites us, through his questions, to enter into a dialogue with him – to engage relationally and not just simply seek him for the right answers. Mike Mason says, “Our deepest longing is not for answers but for Him. Ultimately we’re happier and more satisfied with mysteries than with any amount of explanation.” (Champagne for the Soul: Rediscovering God’s Gift of Joy, 171) This is what we’re after – meeting Jesus in his questions!

You can catch up here if you’ve missed any of the sermons so far.

Note: this series is based on the book “Let Me Ask You a Question: Conversations With Jesus” by Matthew Croasmun.

 

What do you think about this?